Smart Ways to Work and Play

We all know that sitting a lot isn’t good.  You may have heard the phrase ‘sitting is the new smoking’.  Its true that blood sugar and cardiovascular risks go up significantly for people who find themselves in sedentary jobs.  How can we mitigate these health complications when life requires a certain amount of work at a desk?  Why is stress a major factor in every chronic illness?

Continual activity throughout the day is more beneficial for improving glycemic control than a single bout of structured exercise. Just meeting recommended levels of physical activity isn’t enough. By spending the rest of the day sedentary, people are still at risk for insulin resistance leading to diabetes and a disrupted gut microbiome.  Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Avoid sitting for extended periods.
  • Engage in frequent light activity breaks throughout the day.
  • Set up a standing desk and alternate with sitting.
  • Treadmill desks can improve focus and productivity.
  • Ensure that your leisure activities do not involve screen time.
  • Stress management like meditation is very helpful.

Skipping Meals, Caffeine and Stress

I love my work. When I have a lot to do I often can forget to stop and eat.  This in combination with sitting at a desk increases my stress.  On the weekend I have no trouble with blood sugar but this isn’t true when I’m sitting which confirms what the research is saying.

Packing enough of a lunch and starting my day with some movement helps tremendously.  I go for a walk, a swim or do some resistance training.  On my research days I also have a yoga mat out in my office so I can take creative breaks or do some push-ups.  Putting on dance music can also inspire me when needed.

I hear this from many of my patients about how caffeine is a contributor to stress.  The connection between memory loss, blood sugar dysregulation and caffeine addiction is very real for many people working in tech.  The rise in young people with memory loss is not separate from the rise in diabetes.

Life is better when you move

Activity breaks can include taking a walk outside over the lunch hour, or simply getting up to walk to the water dispenser every hour.  Include some social time as this helps to regulate our nervous system.  Having a fun activity to look forward to does as well.  This may be the most important part of your work day.

Of course activity breaks can’t be considered a replacement for other physical activity. Recent research recommends that activity breaks be used daily in the context of an overall healthy lifestyle.  Aiming for 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous intensity exercise is essential as a baseline.

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